Monday, 19 December 2022

Danish Army of the Napoleonic Wars 1801-1815 Volume 3: Norwegian Troops and Militia


My long wait for this book has finally come to an end. This third and final volume describing the Danish army of the Napoleonic Wars 1801-1814 by David Wilson, part of Helion’s from Reason to Revolution 1721-1815 series, continues with the same high level of detail as in the earlier volumes, and presents for us this time the uniforms, organisation and equipment of Norwegian troops and militia, Norway at that time being an integral part of the Danish monarchy, albeit as the poor relation of the partnership. The army was to be tested fighting against he Swedes, where it handled itself well.


This volume follows the same format as the previous ones, and after a brief introduction launches straight in to chapters on each of the different types of cavalry in the army; the high command and military school, line infantry, j├Ągers, ski troops, artillery, colours and guidons, and an almost bewildering but clearly explained host of different classes of militia and coastal defence forces. I found these chapters on the Landevaern, volunteer jaeger and the citizen militias to be particularly interesting and enlightening.


As with Volumes 1 and 2 the book is very well laid out and a pleasant read, packed full of original artwork by the author, with 62 vibrant colour plates, depicting the uniforms and equipment of every regiment and troop type. There are also depictions of the flags and of many of the range of cannon available to the Norwegian armed forces.


The appendices provide supplementary information on  Norwegian cavalry, their horses, and there are also a couple of orders of battle and handy glossary. 


This is an excellent book and the entire three volume series has clearly been a labour of love.


ISBN 978-1-914059-81-0.  222 pages.  

1 comment:

  1. A wonderful book indeed, all three have been a delight to read. I would highly recommend them. There is a wealth of fascinating detail in volume three, much new to me completely.
    Alan Tradgardland

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